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jackson mississippi, good morning. yes, i am a conservative republican from mississippi. i agree with the doctor earlier. i think obamacare is very bad. it is going to go down naturally. i am not for a government shutdown i am for tying it to and doing asing the conservative republicans will done. i think we ought to way entitlements and electric public and in 2014. i am not for a government shutdown and i am not for obamacare. i am tying it to the debt ceiling. host: that is the strategy as far as speaker boehner is concerned. caller: i think that is what we should do. eastern and central time zones and mountain pacific time zones are the options. the numbers are on your screen, you can call the one that best represents you. for and worth -- foreign affairs released a story in the washington post this morning, talking about a reunion of families on both sides in korea -- calls, this is john from idaho, good morning. i believe that republicans are missing an opportunity right now to win if wehe government and make president obama passed the health care and not give people voucher
on the other side of the country this evening, images from mississippi here. trucks right there going straight through the water. and from panama city, florida, images coming in. apartment complex there, just completely under water. these totals are really something. >> in gulfport, mississippi, they've had six inches in two hours. and it's not over. i wish this thing would move, but the front is sitting right there. this goes through wednesday. you're going to have although two to three inches, if you are anywhere from mobile, in through southern parts of alabama there, into the panhandle of florida. and atlanta gets back into that surge of moisture. they've seen way too much rain. not only this month, but this year and there's more to come as we go through the week. >> all right, ginger zee, thank you. >>> now, to the spike in bear attacks we told you about last night re. this is the time of year when they start preparing for hibernation, looki for food. tonight here, the 12-year-old girl attacked in michigan, describing the horror for the first time. here's abc's linzie janis now. >> report
rather have a brand new state of the art pipeline traveling down the margin mississippi and on the trunk to be cut tanker cars and trucks. >> host: there was a story that was reported by the newspaper saying that the decision would likely be until the inspector general looked at the investigation of the conflict of interest complete and the inspector general looked at the complete of the environmental research mismanagement that prepares the environmental impact statement on the keystone xl on the central conflict. >> guest: it's not a new story. that came out and was thoroughly investigated. my understanding is that there were no conflicts found. what you are starting to see frankly is the recycling of a lot of defense. keep in mind, that executive order that was put in place that governs this entire process was put in place to expedite the cross border transportation facilities. instead of expediting it, this environment environmental impact we could have built the empire state building five times buy now. we have completed world war ii in less time. so again as an institutional list a
and mississippi. notice toward the mid-atlantic, the moisture and chance for showers, nothing like the south. either way, the clouds are moving in. heavy rain toward texas. still raining in the southeast. we are talking about the combination bringing eight inches of rain that have been soaked. >> the rain is really stuck there in the southeast. >> this unbelievable amount of rain. this summer, we have seen way over, 10 to 15 inches over. >> how many inches of rain have they seen? >> every place is different but some ten to 15. >> thank you. >>> kind of good news/bad news. it's a deal for the believers convinced we are not alone on the universe. do you believe this? >> yeah. >> the cia is officially acknowledging the existence of super secret area 51. the documents include a map of the location in the nevada desert. would you go, berman? >> mm-hmm. >> you would? >> mm-hmm. >> they said it's a testing sight for surveillance during the cold war. >> you believe that? >> i do. >> if they are not doing the alien autopsies there, where are they doing them? they are doing them somewhere? >> yeah. i'
be in mississippi or anywhere else. -- trent would like people to think he would rather be in mississippi or anywhere else. he's in a position to do very well here. in that clip we showed jim van i -- >> the executive director of "politico." >> you quote him. he is contemptuous of washington's it used to be better reflects. -- reflex. what is he saying there? are we old-timers worthless? jim is putting forth the view that the age at which the 20 boys on the bus are setting the agenda in their one story they write or file a day are over. of the missions of "politico" is to democratize the conversation. 100,000 people can read mike allen every day. everyone can blog about it. what jim was saying is that there is this wild west. there is this notion that the conversation has been broken open. disparaging, as especially of the body types of my forbearers in the journalism world. he was probably just trying to draw a sharp contest -- contrast. >> is there such a group, middle-age, left of center, overweight men who decided how the way all of us see politics and governance. you can. -- >> -- ca
on the south. i said, if we do not see meaningful progress, we will march through virginia, through mississippi and several other places. do your a member? >> i remember all that. i was donated to the march on washington committee and my task was distributing john's speech, the original speech to murmurs of the press who were seated down below lincoln, still above on the steps. i passed out these copies of john's speech and pointed out to them, that john would be the only speaker speaking that day who talk about black people instead of negroes or colored people as was the fashion. i thought and we thought that this demonstrated how militant we were and how different we were and better and superior we were from the other civil rights organizations. none of the reporters made any objection. [laughter] >> what did you mean by militant? >> i meant aggressive. nothing harmful or violent. i have always been upset by people who say, they are so militant. they equate it with violence. it is not necessarily equitable with violence. it just means somebody is it aggressively in pursuit of his ideas. we th
right. pull out, everybody. i'll let you watch. >> mississippi. 7 mississippi. fail. >> and in fact, the car flips over. >> oh, my gosh. >> can you believe this? the dash camera catches everything. rolls over on its side. and flips. apparently the translation in korean is great. roll it again. we'll just have some fun. but apparently the driving instructor says "brake, brake, brake!" [ bleep ], what do we do? what do we do? as the car starts turning over on its side. right about here. okay. >> oh, oh, oh. >> he says, what are you doing, don't know which gas pedal you are pressing! i'm going crazy! get out of this car! >> i could have done the translation from what she was doing. you can hear her go oh, oh, oh, oh. >> it sounds the same in any language, the expletive. doesn't it? >> oh, oh, oh. >> failed in seven seconds. worst driver ever! >> and over again. >>> here is a video you are going to want to watch. this one is great. group of young youtubers, true story asa team have posted a video of themselves, they usually -- they're pranksters. this time they changed up the tone. this
every hill of mississippi and from every mountainside. let freedom ring, and when it happens, when we allow freedom to ring, when we let it ring from every village and from every state and every city we will be able to speed up the day that all of us black men and white men choose power and we will be able to join hands and sing in the old spirit of free at last, free at last. thank god almighty we are free at last. [applause] >> on a sunday morning in september of 1963, for young black girls attended sunday school at the 16th st. storch church. the bible lesson was a love that for dallas. the girl moved to the basement when suddenly an always went through the church like a cannon. the bomb planted near the basement went through the house of worship. they toppled a gruesome discovery. sandia, age 14, carroll robertson, age 14. addy mae colins and denise age 11 all were found dead, their bodies buried atop one another. >> it's great to be visible all through dallas. >> it will only be a matter of minutes before he arrives at the turnpike. >> they got in the newsroom and as perhaps you
office is located in jackson mississippi. i have been with a head start since 1988 and i am excited to be here today to share some of our concerns about sequestration . >> i'm the associate director for education income maintenance of labor, part of the executive office of the president. we oversee the budgets of a number of federal agencies including education and the administration for children family. >> and the director of policy and planning. i started my 20 years ago. i'm really happy to be it today. >> was president budgets, policy, and economic cover tentative. i worked for secretary sibila is set the department of health and human services. >> i'm the managing director for economic policy here at the center for american progress. deficits and debt. >> was wondering if we could start with you. we heard numbers mentioned in the introduction. i wonder he might drill down on the more. the office has some additional information. maybe even what we might be seeing if sequestration continues. >> let me start. our topline numbers of children now. that's about 6,000 infants and todd
the opportunity to stand on the deck of a new bridge over the mississippi river, 16 feet board to go. i could watch this go down the nations greatest river. theas an awesome view. people that we serve know that we need to build the next great bridges and maintain the futures that all americans drive on. we're tremendously honored. we want to hear from our first guest here, congressman bill shuster. he oversees house action on all the transportation including maritime, highway, mass transit, and railroad. obeying hiss is ninth congressional district and has searched on the committee since his first election to congress in 2000 one. welcome. >> thank you very much. great examplet that i can take back to washington as to how the parties can work together. we need a good example. i really appreciate the opportunity to be here. at every state i have been to this is my first visit to wisconsin. penn state is going to prevail this year. i look at a couple of other governors. thosek forward to engagements. it is an opportunity for me to engage with governors. have traveled around the country, seeing
: next call comes from stark phill mississippi. >> host: please go ahead. >> caller: in 97i was in middle school in mississippi and from the gif corporation dr. carson came to talk to the students at the school and i wanted to know was he making a national tour to visit the different schools because we also had to read his books and write reports. i want to know was he planning on making vose? >> host: what did you think of dr. carson's visit when you were in middle school? >> caller: this is the reason i'm calling. one of the things that stuck out to me in his book is he said he had an ander management problem. and so in my town, that's one of the things with the young people that is on the rise, a lot of armed robberies and rising murders and so he decided he found a way to channel that energy into a directed effort and so i wanted to know -- that's what got me in this book. but it was in '97, '98. i wanted to know can he bring that energy fishback? >> host: can you tell let him personally as well? >> guest: i will. thank you so much. i've been actually traveling around the country givi
mississippi. that is not good news for >>> over the weekend. manuel bojorquez is in gulf port, mississippi. manuel good morning to you. >> . >> reporter: good morning to our viewers out west. the threat remains to the florida panhandle. with the ground saturated, residents are keeping a watchful eye on the gulf. they are concerned about what a tropical storm or hurricane this season could mean. like much of the southeast, gulf port has been pounded by record rainfall, getting nearly 5 inches in 2 hours at one point. that caught people off guard. twenty-two streets here were flooded. downtown businesses are cleaning up from as much as 18 inches of water now, of course, gulf port and the gulf coast are no strangers to heavy rainfall; but residents here say the recent storms flooded parts of the city that didn't flood during hurricane katrina back in 2005. charlie and gale? . >> manuel thanks. >> if police officers arrest you, do they have the right to search your smartphone. the obama administration believes the answer is yes. however two federal courts disagree. now the white house wants t
first discovered the following places, florida, pacific ocean, the mississippi river, the st. lawrence river. >> you don't know who won the battle of quebec? >> no. i don't know who was fighting in the battle of quebec. >>> we have news this morning. developing story out of the michigan, the doctor accused of trying to profit by mistreating carson patients. the fed raided his office. what his lawyer is saying this morning. >> this has allegedly been going on for years. >>> on a happier note, he's the nfl oldest rookie, 2 years old. brian banks is getting a shot at his nfl dream. so many people rooting for him. >> i love this story, you'll hear from him coming up. >>> and you may have seen the can chilo infomercial, and this morning mom testers are back putting as seen on tv products through their paces. that's coming up. >>> but to the major development, the end of a certain in idaho's back country for a murder suspect on the run with a teenage girl. he was shot dead by an fbi tack day cal agent, and this morning, his victim, 16-year-old hannah anderson is to be reunited with her fathe
of quebec. who first discovered the following places, florida, pacific ocean, the mississippi river, the st. lawrence river? >> you don't know who won the battle of quebec? >> yes, no, i don't. >> where did you go to school? >> i don't even know who was fighting in the battle of quebec. >>> we do have some news this morning. coming up. developing story out of michigan, the doctor accused of trying to profit by allegedly mistreating cancer patients. the feds have raided his office. what his lawyer is saying this morning. >> this has allegedly been going on for years. >>> on a happier note, he's the nfl's oldest rookie. he's 28 years old. after serving time for a crime he didn't commit, brian banks is finally getting a shot at his nfl dream. so many people rooting for him. >> i love this story and his attitude is extraordinary. you'll hear from him coming up. >>> and in these dog days of summer, you may have seen the infomercials for the items such as the chillow. that's a pillow that keeps your head cool while you sleep. this morning mom testers are back putting as seen on tv products throug
. , james is ini ocean springs, and he supports same-sex marriage. >> yes, and mississippi, of .ourse, does not recognize i am originally from louisiana, and it is not recognized. but just like all other civil progress, the south as far behind. it will take some time to reach it, but we will eventually get there. lived inng have you mississippi? >> just over a year. of the time i spent in louisiana and i lived in baileys, central america, for the last five years before e,ming to mississippi -- beliz central america, for the last five years before coming to mississippi. >> mark, go ahead with your comment. thismain point to all of is, we live in a great country and everybody has the right to be wrong. everybody has the right to be right. what we have here is a battle over semantics, i think. can be think the union called marriage because marriage is a sacrament. it is sacred. it is holy. , a homosexual marriage, is sodomy. that is not holy. that is an unholy union. if you want to go ahead and have the government take care of all of your finances and everything after you die, then call it som
in the '60s -- >> in mississippi. >> not only that, i'm a student of my history. i have said this many times, it's not a part of who i am to use that word. i understand why other people do. it's impossible for me to do it, because i know the history, and i know that for so many of my relatives, whom i don't know, who i don't know by name, people who i am connected to, my ancestors, that was the last word they heard as they were being strung up by a tree. that was the last sense of degradation that they experienced as some harm was caused to them. i just -- it's just not a part of the fabric of who i am. so out of respect to those who have come before, and the price that they paid to rid themselves of being relegated to that word, i just don't use it. >> we had a fascinating conversation. more on my interview with oprah winfrey and forest whittaker tomorrow on "360." lee daniels "the butler" opens tomorrow. just ahead, the custody battle over veronica. the adoptive parents are in oklahoma to try to bring their daughter home. randi kaye has new details ahead. especially today, as people are lo
the gulf coast and florida panhandle all the way into south carolina. gulfport, mississippi, the floodwaters receding there but with more rain in the forecast they may rise yet again. tracking it all for us is chad myers. ha is the latest, chad? >> anderson, when you have a stationary front, like a stationary bike, things don't move. you can pedal that bike all you want, it is not going anywhere. these storms aren't going anywhere. so what is raining now was raining an hour ago and what was raining this weekend is pretty much still raining at this point. look at these five-day rainfall totals. this is from friday afternoon to now. 12.5 inches in florida thachlt is a beach. not much of a beach vacation. panama city, popular place, ten inches of rainfall over the weekend. everywhere that you see red, that's six inches. at purple higher than that, and the ten-inch bulls eyes, macon, georgia, has 24 more inches on ground than they should have. so when it rains, it floods. there's no place for the water to soak in. it's been like that for days and days and days and the rain conti
discovered the following places, florida, pacific ocean, the mississippi river, the st. lawrence river. >> you don't know who won the battle of quebec? >> yes. no, i don't. >> where did you go to school? >> i don't know who was fighting in the battle of quebec. >>> we have news this morning. developing story out of the michigan, the doctor accused of trying to profit by mistreating cancer patients. the fed raided his office. what his lawyer is saying this case this morning. >> this has allegedly been going on for years. >>> on a happier note, he's the nfl's oldest rookie, he's 28 years old, and after serving times for a crime he did not commit. brian banks is getting a shot at his nfl dream. so many people rooting for him. >> i love this story, his attitude is great. you'll hear from him coming up. >>> and you may have seen the can chillow infomercial, and this morning mom testers are back putting as seen on tv products through their paces. that's coming up. >>> but to the major development, the end of a search in idaho's back country for a murder suspect on the run with a teenage girl
it was just the way i was cultivated -- i don't know, it was just the way i was cultivated. mississippi was always a scary place because emmett till was murdered there. , when i go south i still remember that i am black, and i wonder if people will see anything, and all they ever say -- all they ever say is, "y'all come back, you hear," or "we wish you were president, bill." it always stuns me. i'm gun shy because of how i was brought up. but we had a wonderful time in west virginia. michael in alabama is calling on our republican line. hello, i would like to say about race, you know, every time a black person kills a white person, it's ok, but if a white person kills a black person, they set out to do it as a race thing. it's not a race thing all the time. we are past all that now. we need to learn to love each other and accept people for who complaining -- guest: who was complaining? well, i mean, the blacks always complain -- why don't you think we are explaining our circumstances? caller: well, they just complain -- you know, get over what happened in the past. south.you are from th
in meridian, mississippi in an integrated school. and went to school at university of alabama at a very integrated campus and at a campus that in the 1980s was actually handling racial issues a lot better than a lot of campuses across the northeast. but martin luther king not only did for america but what he did for his home region of the south, a region that had been scarred by racism and racial tensions for years. to see how quickly things -- he gave this speech the year i was born in a segregated south and segregated america. by the time i started first grade in meridian mississippi it w was integrated. that is nothing short of extraordinary and that is a legacy that we put first at the feet of martin luther king and also all the civil rights workers and protesters and leaders who gave their all to make sure that white children like myself and black children who were my friends, who i played football with in first grade and baseball with in first grade, would go to school together. that was the normal. that was normal for me. let me -- al, let me go to you quickly here. it is incredi
the context here and the whole climate was set. jim was in jail than mississippi. the sheriff's told the black inmates either beat her or we will be to you. so they beat her unconscious. so there were 200 demonstrations of the country that day and people going to jail. the public accommodations bill, the dream was the right to vote. the dream of 66 was in chicago for housing. the treen at 67 was the poor people's campaign to end the war mike in vietnam. dr. king made the case from 32% down to 12 on the lyndon johnson war on poverty. by the way, our hearts were trained with pain johnson had no background on civil rights. only the civil rights legislator in the history of the country and passed with lyndon johnson and 64 kuhl of the voting rights act of 65, daycare, child-care, speeding programs, appellations, the regional council, all of that is lbj. the record matches are lyndon baines johnson. the speech is always around. from the last staff meeting it went something like this. i had a migraine headache for nine days and maybe my time is up. maybe i've done as much as i could do. maybe i shou
was cultivated. mississippi was always a scary --ace because emmett till was because emmett till was murdered there. and yet, when i go south i still remember that i am black, and i wonder if people will see anything, and all they ever say is, "y'all come back, you hear," or "we wish you were president, bill." it always stuns me. i'm gun shy because of how i was brought up. but we had a wonderful time in west virginia. host: michael in alabama is calling on our republican line. caller: yeah, hello, i would like to say about race, you know, every time a black person kills a white person, it's ok, but if a white person kills a black person, they set out to do it as a race thing. it's not a race thing all the time. we are past all that now. we need to learn to love each other and accept people for who they are in good complaining -- -- quit and planning. guest: who was complaining? caller: well, i mean, the blacks always complain -- guest: why don't you think we are explaining our circumstances? caller: well, they just complain you know, get over what happened in the past. guest: you are from th
themselves. >> host: on our line for independents. randy in west point, mississippi. >> caller: good morning! >> host: good morning. >> caller: if the ports in savannah, georgia going to be upgraded for the new tanker ships? thank you. >> guest: the the port of savannah is currently in the process of working in the corp. of engineer and the federal government to deepen the savannah river so it will be able to accommodate larger vessel the project is underway in term of that investment and improvement. similarly in gulf port, mississippi. as you know, that port was significantly impacted by katrina a few years ago. as part of the process of rebuilding and revitallyization of the mississippi coastline there's activity involved in terms of improvements and investment in and around the port or gulf port to both revitalize that community that have devastated by the hurricane, but also importantly to be able to handle the new type of vessel that will be transiting in to the gulf of mexico in a few short years. >> we have about fifteen minutes left with our guest. he's the president and chief execu
violence escalating, the ku klux klan skyrockets, you have the mississippi codes, which began in 1877 and were crystallized in 1901. it deprived blacks of being able to own property. restricts voting rights. for example, in mississippi. and i think in 1871, 97% of african-american men can vote in the state of mississippi. when hayes ends reconstruction, 10 years later, less than 1.5% of african-american men can vote. the violence, the intimidation, the grandfather's clause, the poll tax. it is really two separate nations where african-americans emboldened by frederick douglass in the north began to really organize and begin to secure the rights while the south have theirs stripped away. >> mike is watching us in honolulu. you are on. go ahead. >> can you hear me? >> yes, thanks. >> it is hawaii standard time. i have a direct relative to my grandmother, of course. her name is jesse hayes. she was born in 1870. in the lower midwest. probably, by blood, long removed. i looked at this beautiful lucy sitting in the chair, looking at the camera with those big eyes, and her beautiful childre
tempore: the gentleman yields. for what purpose does the gentleman from mississippi rise? >> mr. speaker, unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. >> mr. speaker, i'm not a fan of government mandates, and neither are my constituents in mississippi. but there is one mandate that the people of mississippi sent me to washington with, to repeal, replace, dismantle, delay, and defund obamacare. i have heard from families, small businesses, and hardworking americans across my district who all have the same message -- this law is a train wreck. mr. palazzo: that is why one of my very first votes in congress was to repeal obamacare. that's why i voted to repeal it nearly 40 times over the last three years. that is why i introduce add constitutional amendment to restore the right of the american people to refuse this bad law. that is also why i firmly believe we must defund obamacare in a continuing resolution this body will take up later this year. i believe this is a fight worth fighting for mississippi. and
. mississippi has just the one clinic in jackson. that one, the republicans are fighting to close that one down as well and it seems like they may be close to doing it. in north dakota, same deal. there's one clinic for the whole great big state. this spring republicans passed a law that aims to shut down that one last clinic. in alabama, there are five clinics that provide abortion services. republicans passed laws in the spring that would close three of the five clinics. in virginia, the number of clinics right now is at 20. it's slated to go to four. in north carolina, 16 facilities, republicans passed new restrictions that are expected to close 15 of those. 15 of the 16. so this is before the republican party in north carolina launched its efforts to shut down clinics and this is likely to be after. it is sometimes difficult to explain this larger trend of republicans creating these new impossible to meet demands on abortion clinics. these legal requirements designed to shut clinics down. in the aning a stran ing ing a, imagine what that means. in the specific, when it's happening it seems
out dirt farmers all over the midwest and the mississippi valley handing them one-way tickets to the vehicle city as flint nicknamed itself. the newcomers slept in shacks, tents and railroad cars. earl's family rented a tiny house, all he could afford on his factory pay. after the war earl tried farming again, failed again and returned to flint for good. everett grew up a city boy with no agricultural ambitions. after graduating from high school in 1933, he enlisted in general motors as an apprentice tool and dye maker at 50 cents an hour. the job could disappear in a day. if a supervisor wanted to hire his brother-in-law, he created ap opening by handing a worker a yellow slip, the color of termination. bachelors were laid off while married men with lower seniority kept their jobs. the supervision, they had no control either, everett recalled. you could come in today and have a desk and have a yellow slip on there that said you're all done. on november 12th, three welders conducted a short pro-union sit-down demonstration. in protest, a department in the plant stopped working
well is somewhere in mississippi. >> in that clip, we show mike allen and jim vaned high whose job is -- >> the executive director of politico. >> you quote him in here. this quote came to you from him? >> i'll read it. >> jim vaned high is contemptuous of washington -- it used to be better reflex of how he relates to news. he said it was largely, and this is true for decades, a small group of middle age left of center overweight men who decided how all of us should see politics and govern us. what is he saying there? so we old timers are worthless. >> he's setting the view that those 20 boys on the bus setting the agenda in the one story they file in a day are over. its's to demock rattize the discussion. anyone can tweet or blog about it. i think what jim was saying there is that there is this wild west. there is this notion that the conversation is broken open. i wouldn't be disparaging of the body types of my forebearers. but he -- so i think that he was probably just trying to draw a sharp contrast. >> was there such a group around here? a small group of middle aged -- i don't
and thunderstorms east of the mississippi. and the heaviest from new york down to the carolinas. >> upper 70s from boston to new york. mostly 80s in the midwest. 90s in the southeast. triple digits from dallas to phoenix. >>> all right. we have approximately 425 million reasons why this is our "favorite story of the day." you probably know why by now? >> simply because tonight's powerball jackpot is now up to at least $425 million. it is the fourth largest top prize in the multistate lottery's history. >> no one has won the jackpot since june 22nd. that's why it's high. as always your chances of winning are 175 million:1. good luck to everyone. especially the commish. of course, he obviously wrote this script for us. >> he wrote the script. >> the script. >> good luck to me. ha-ha. >> hey, someone has got to win, commish. right? >> would you come in the next day if you won? >> not a chance. >> not a chance. not a chance. >> he is with me. >> you say no. >> call out sick. lay low. figure out what i'm going to do. >> i will tell you on television. the dangerous things i would do if i were to become
as well. a slight risk of strong storms into the central and upper mississippi river valleys. beautiful weather up in the west coast. 89 >>> 7:36. good tuesday morning to you. meteorologist christina loren. this is san jose. we have the same dark sky just about everywhere. overcast conditions for the first part of the day. we'll see a nice sunny finish. temperatures stay comfortable. 79 degrees on the way to livermore, 80 in fairfield, 77 concord and 74 degrees in beautiful redwood city for today. holding steady through thursday, then we'll crank the heat up come this weekend. hope you have a fantastic day. >>> don't forget any time you need that weather go to the weather channel or weather.com online, savannah. >>> all right. al, thank you so much. this morning on rossen reports, the summer months are peek moving season and some rogue companies are looking to take advantage of it. jeff rossen is on the case. good morning to you. >> we are here to help. a lot of us move. 35 million americans a year and when you hire a moving company you trust them with everything but authorities say com
will in mississippi. >> caller: how you do. >> host: go ahead, sir. >> caller: nice to talk with y'all today in '97, '98, i was in middle school in mississippi, and dr. carson came to speak to the students at the school, and i want to know was he making national tour to come visit different states and different schools? because we also had to read his book and write reports in middle school. and i want to know, was he planning on making those types of trips against. >> host: what did you think of dr. carson's visit when you were in middle school? >> caller: this is the reason i'm calling. one of the things that stood out to me in his book was he had an anger management problem, and so in my town, one of the things that have -- with the young people that is on the rise, anger, a lot of. the rivalries, aa rise in murders, so he found a way to channel the energy into direct it elsewhere, and so i wanted to know -- and that stood out his book believe i wrote on that topic but it was in 1997 and 1998. so i wonder can bring that back and circulate throughout the united states. >> host: can you tell the t
not doing anything, probably not saying anything. >> host: next call from robert in mississippi. >> caller: how are you doing? nice talking with you today. in 1997-1998 i was in middle schools in mississippi and dr. carson came to speak to students at the school and i wanted to know, was he making a national tour to come to different states in different schools because we also had to read his book and right research ports in middle school and i wanted to know was the plan on making those? >> host: what did you make of dr. carson's visit? >> this is the reason i am calling. one of the things that stood out to me in his boat was he had a name for a management problem and in my calendar that is one of the things with young people on the rise. and rising murders and found a way to challenge energy in directing and elsewhere and i wanted to know, that stuck out to me and i wrote on the topic but it was 97-98 so i don't remember but i want to know could he bring that back to the united states and young people? >> host: tell the temper story as well. >> guest: i will. thank you so much. i have be
, they essentially came the storm troopers of the movement. able to the mississippi delta were other organizations were afraid to go. certainly her. fannie lou hamer after the mississippi delta, sharecropping family, ma who, by her own account, by report went to school only one day, created, in her entire life. i would are used by one of the most eloquent spokespersons for the aims of the movement. a speech that she gave at the democratic national convention in 1964, you can you do it. if you have not heard it, here it. because it is the most eloquent statement that i have heard, courageous woman and is deathly her paper think if we move from a national level to the local level, the list grows and grows. one of, i was the one of the most exciting things about being sort of doing this history, being involved in a scholarly production of literacy about the civil rights movement is about a lot of really good stuff that is coming out that's talked about his local activists, were anonymous for the most part but without them he would not affect a national movement. and i think it was to go back to the p
, they essentially were the storm troopers of the movement. they went into the mississippi delta where other organizations were afraid to go. certainly her, out of the mississippi delta, sharecropping family, who went to school just one day period in her entire life. i would argue it's one of the most eloquent spokesperson for the aims of the movement. the speech given at the democratic national convention in 1964, you can youtube it. if you've not heard it, hear it. it is the most eloquent statement that i've heard, courageous woman. i mean, there's definitely her, but, again, i think if we move from the national level to the local level, the list grows and grows. one of the most exciting things about doing this history, being involved in this scholarly production of literature about the sighful rights movement is that we have a lot of good stuff coming out that is talking about the local activists who are anonymous for the most part, but without whom you would not have had a national movement, and if we go back to the point of where we are at today, clearly, it's a point where we have to b
. a slight risk of strong storms in the upper mississippi river valley. tomorrow, we're looking at more wet weather moving into the northeast, mid-atlantic states, the upper ohio river valley. western half of the country sunny and hot. the heat extends down near the gulf. down >>> good wednesday morning to you. i'm meteorologist christina loren. temperatures are pretty comfortable out there right now. we are in the upper 50s, low 60s, live look at san jose shows you we still have clouds overhead. that natural ac moving all the way inland this morning, means a cooler afternoon. as a result, 70 degrees. today, in san francisco, a little bit cooler than average and temperatures are going to continue to drop off as we head through the nix couple of days. 87 degrees by thursday. up to 91 degrees on friday. >>> don't forget. get that weather any time you need it. go to the weather channel on cable or weather.com online. >>> in the world of country music it does not get much bigger than dolly parton. she is a legendary singer and song writer and actress and entrepreneur. she shared big news with w
in damage. changing that area of louisiana, mississippi, alabama, the gulf coast, forever. and you juxtapose that with the fact this has been a quiet hurricane season. as a matter of fact, the last time we were hurricane-free in august was 2002. hurricane gustav on september 11, 2002. why is it quiet? as the systems come off the african coast they hit drier stabler air and die out. we don't see any change coming but out west they have been active. moisture is going to make its way into the southwest so over the weekend look for from 1 to 2 inches of rain from southern california into the southwest. there may be some flash flooding. we're going to get to your local forecast in the next 30 seconds. r who's secretly serving steaks from walmart. it's a steak over! dude, it's so good. it's juicy. it's nice and tender. only one in five steaks is good enough to be called walmart choice premium steak. all these steaks are from walmart. oh my gosh! top ten most tender steaks i've had. i'm going to start buying meat at walmart. walmart's prices are so low you could have steak at every game. it's 100%
you, mr. president. a senator: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from mississippi. mr. cochran: mr. president, i'm very pleased to be able to join my colleagues in wishing dave schiappa well in his next adventure in life, and knowing it will be successful, and also build upon his knowledge and experience here in the u.s. senate. i know his contributions will continue, and it will be a pleasure to continue to follow him in whatever career or noncareer or on vacation, whatever he chooses to do, will be happy and rewarding as has his tenure here in the united states senate. no one is more respected, more appreciated than david schiappa. so it is a sad day in many ways to see him leave, but a happy one to know that he's going to begin a new era, and we will watch him closely and stay in touch with him and continue to appreciate him for throughout his career and life. the presiding officer: the senator from wyoming. mr. barrasso: mr. president, i'd just like to add to the comments. in wyoming, we have what's called the code of the west. and while david schiappa may be the m
thomas, the mother of three from mississippi at the new orleans saints training camp as a referee. >> and she is a member of the league's referee training program in line for an official full-time job. "gma" anchor josh elliott has her story. >> here we go. >> reporter: in the bold black and white stripes and hair tucked under that plaque hat, the official looks exactly like every other one on the field. >> watch your step here, 17. little tight. little tight. >> reporter: 39-year-old sarah thomas, married mother of three is on the verge of history. >> are you a tomboy? >> i am a tomboy, yes. but i am married with two boys. >> reporter: poised to become the first ever full time female official for the national football league. >> where's mama? >> 72, you've got to move up on those pass plays. put your guard up. put your guard up. individually, i am a female. a lot of things set us apart. race, gender, different background. but collectively, we're out there for the same goal. >> reporter: for 15 years, on fir -- officiating grade school, high school, and college games. discovered b
built a new peline that feeds the jynt wrb refinery near st. louis across the mississippi river and to the refinery. all they have to do is double up on that pipeline, ship the oil down. might cost more in the long run but who know what is they're paying for land leases to the gulf coast. so it's a way to get around the problem. the right of way is already there. you never hear anybody mention it. host: a couple of international stories for you. from the financial times this morning, host: john from boston, massachusetts. caller: i've been watching for a while, what i've learned about politics is sometimes we have a problem i think in this country it's not so much the country any more it has become love of party. i've been watching and no matter what politician you look at in the united states, no matter state or federal, it's become love of party. and where -- they represent the people.shouldn't they doing the for the people? host: doug from springfield. good morning. caller: good morning. my question would be i appreciate you guys and everything you do. i would like some answe
news channel 12 down in mississippi following the revelations about operation cross country. .his shows improvements needed they know the child sex trafficking response act of 2013 was streamlined data collections and report on sex --fficking by requiring a republican saying that this legislation is intended to improve the ability of caregivers to ensure that children at risk and get help that they require. if you could talk in general terms about what that would do for him. >> this is an issue for us. we estimate about 60% of may be involved in child prostitution's. they may be solicited. it is an issue we are aware of. to make sure that when a kid goes missing a third or fourth or fifth time from these foster homes there is a tendency to not report them. why bother? we need to know when and where they may be going so we can more actively track them and keep them from being alerted to this. >> he talked about some of the john's who use these and crayon these children. start jailing the john's who use child prostitution and putting their faces on page one. is from miramar beach florida
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